THE METEOR HUNT
by Jules Verne

Publisher:  University of Nebraska Press

Pub Date:  2006

Format:   Trade Paperback

Brief Description
  
The original novel that Jules Verne left upon his death, published for the first time in the English language.
     T
ells the humorous and fantastical story of a rivalry between two amateur astronomers as they each try to seize a sphere of gold which has appeared in space.
(see below for Full Description)

 

 

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Full Description
       This version of METEOR HUNTING, the only authentic version, is now available to readers in its original free tone, fantasy, and ironic philosophy.
       METEOR HUNTING--originally entitled Hurtling Fireball (Le Bolide)--is a funny, light-hearted novel with a purely imaginative story. Jules Verne, who began the project in 1901, had been carrying the idea with him for thirty years, ever since he wrote Hector Servadac in 1874, originally entitled Across the Solar World. The author had dared to imagine the fall of the Comet Gallia to the earth, destroying capitalists. Unfortunately, his science-fiction conclusion had been refused by publisher Hetzel, Senior, who preferred an unrealistic ending in which Servadac had just "had a dream." A quarter of a century later, Verne took the opportunity to avenge himself, this time freely expressing his contempt for riches.
       METEOR HUNTING tells the humorous and fantastical story of a rivalry between two amateur astronomers as they each try to seize a sphere of gold which has appeared in space. At the end of this comic and cosmic hunt, the rivals come home empty-handed. The discovery of a tasty new dish does more for the good of humanity than the discovery of a star, ironizes Jules Verne, quoting Brillat-Savarin.
       Within the verve of "astronomical"--even "meteorical"--humor, less humorous subjects pierce their way through the lines: reflections on marriage, divorce, freedom of the American way of life, gold speculation, and the vanity of riches--and even a certain metaphysical anxiety: many grave subjects, too serious for Jules Hetzel and Michel Verne, who systematically placed them in opposition.


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